Tending Cultural Landscapes and Food Citizenship in Toronto’s Community Gardens

Abstract:

Scattered throughout the city of Toronto are community gardens, sites of place-based politics connected to the community food-security movement. The gardens, spaces where passions for plants and food are shared, reflect the city’s shifting cultural landscape and represent an everyday activity that is imbued with multiple meanings. Toronto’s community food-security movement uses gardens as one strategy to regenerate the local food system and provide access to healthy, affordable food. Three garden case studies expand on the complexities of “food citizenship,” illustrating the importance of that concept to notions of food security. The gardens reveal the role gardeners play in transforming urban spaces, the complex network of organizations working cooperatively and in partnership to implement these projects, and the way in which social and cultural pluralism are shaping the urban landscape.

Citation:

Lauren Baker “Tending Cultural Landscapes and Food Citizenship in Toronto’s Community Gardens” Geographical Review 94.3(2010):305-325.

Link:

Tending Cultural Landscapes and Food Citizenship in Toronto’s Community Gardens