The Urban Creative-Food Economy: Producing Food for the Urban Elite or Social Inclusion Opportunity?

Abstract:

The food industry has always been a major generator of economic activity in the Greater Toronto Area. However, recently the innovative and creative elements of the industry have changed. Since the mid-1990s, the fastest growing segment within the industry has been small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs). The specialty, ethnic, and organic SMEs (hereinafter referred to as the ‘creative-food’ industry) appear to be particularly innovative as they respond to consumer demand for local, fresh, ethnic, and fusion cuisine. A disconnect currently exists between, on the one hand, the traditional agrifood paradigm that the government regulatory environment is promoting and, on the other hand, the locally consumer-driven food cluster that is emerging. Contrary to a widely held view, the creative-food industry is not just about promoting exclusive foods for the pleasure of urban elite. Rather, it offers an opportunity for a more socially inclusive and sustainable urban development model.

Citation:

Blay-Palmer, Alison. “The Urban Creative-Food Economy: Producting Food for the Urban Elite or Social Inclusion Opportunity?” Environment and Planning 38.10(2005):1901-1920.

Link:

The Urban-Creative Food Economy: Producing Food for the Urban Elite or Social Inclusion Opportunity?