In Every Community a Place for Food: The Role of the Community Food Centre

Abstract:

Since food banks were first established in the early 1980s, a growing number of Ontarians have come to rely on food charities to meet their basic needs. These under-resourced charitable organizations can provide only uneven service, and the food quality is often less than optimal. Thus many low-income people either go hungry or consume cheap, processed foods — which contributes to the high rates of poor health and diet-related illness seen in poorer communities. Over the years, The Stop Community Food Centre in the Davenport West community of Toronto has evolved from a food bank into a thriving community centre where people come together to grow, cook, and eat food, as well as to advocate for measures that can increase food security in the wider community. This paper suggests that The Stop can serve as a model for those seeking to address key issues of food insecurity in other communities.

Citation:

Kathryn. Scharf, Charles Levkoe, & Nick Saul.“In Every Community a Place for Food: The Role of the Community Food Centre in Building a Local, Sustainable, and Just Food System” Metcalf Food Solutions. Toronto, ON: The Metcalf Foundation, 2010.

Link:

In Every Community a Place for Food: The Role of the Community Food Centre