Our Members

Adeline Cohen

Adeline Cohen

Adeline Cohen  is an agricultural engineer by background. She is an Intermediate Consultant at Eco-Ethonomics Inc., a firm specializing in social enterprise, governance, policy and organizational development for the non-profit and public sectors. She is also a Senior Fellow at the University Health Network’s OpenLab, where she leads collaborative projects aiming at raising the profile of local and sustainable food in health care.

Andrea Boucaud

Andrea Boucaud

Andrea Boucaud who is known to many as “PEACHTREE” is an advocate for and supporter within the grassroots organizing and community development spaces. She has worked within the community development and the arts for over 15 years in many rolls including small business creation, advocacy and social justice all while maintaining her passion for fashion.  She is a mother, daughter, social justice advocate, an ancient soul and an African woman in the diaspora re-learning how to grow good food everyday. Peachtree is the current Manager of the Green Barn with the Stop Community Food Centre.

Anita Prasad

Anita Prasad  is a grass roots community development worker and organizer whose journey over the last 15 years has covered community food security, human rights, education, mental health, urban poverty, and community-based environmental justice and conservation both in Canada and India, and from both urban and rural lenses. Currently Anita works with homeless populations across the city of Toronto on issues of food security, working on a systems level with the community food sector. Her work focuses on health and nutrition through improved access to affordable, fresh, healthy, culturally appropriate food for marginalized and low-income communities. Anita brings global experience, perspectives, knowledge and stories to the work of food justice and food policy in Toronto.

Ashna Bowry

Ashna Bowry is an academic Family Physician at St Michael’s Hospital, Toronto. She trained at the University of Bristol, UK and completed a residency in Family Medicine at the University of Toronto. Ashna graduated with an MSc degree in International Health and Tropical Medicine from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. Ashna’s clinical focus is providing primary care to vulnerable patients in inner-city Toronto, mainly pediatric, mental health and chronic disease management cases.

Barry Martin

Barry Martin

Barry Martin is the Founder and Principal of Hypenotic, a full service communications and design firm. Over the past 14 years, Barry has worked with a number of food and farm organizations in Ontario, including Sustain Ontario – The Alliance for Healthy Food and Farming, the Ontario Culinary Tourism Alliance, Fiesta Farms, The Friends of the Greenbelt Foundation, Southbrook Winery, Fifth Town Cheese, Local Food Plus and others. Barry sits on the Slow Food Toronto steering Committee.

Bashir Munye

Bashir Munye is a culinary professor at George Brown College and food advocate who specializes in global cuisines using locally grown and culturally diverse foods. He is committed to supporting and promoting small scale farmers and artisanal producers, and using Ontario grown world crops. Bashir’s professional goal is to be an agent of systemic policy and curriculum change in the current narrative of culinary institutions, so that they are more representative of the dynamic, diverse communities who live in Toronto. He advocates for good, clean food for all through teaching, public speaking, food demonstrations, workshops and other projects.

Daniel Bender

Daniel Bender

Daniel Bender is the Canada Research Chair in Global Culture, a professor of history and food studies, and the director of the Culinaria Research Centre at the University of Toronto. The author and editor of three books, his research focuses on histories of food, empire, and tourism. He is also a co-convenor of the international partnership “City Food: Lessons from People on the Move,” an academic-public partnership that examines the culinary infrastructure of diverse cities. It includes partners in New York, Sydney, Delhi, Tokyo, Shanghai, Turin, and Singapore.

David Crombie

David Crombie (Special Advisor) has served as Mayor of Toronto (1972-1978), Member of Parliament (1978-1988), and federal cabinet minister. He has also served as President and CEO of the Canadian Urban Institute, Chair of Ontario Place, founding Chair of the Waterfront Regeneration Trust and Chancellor of Ryerson University. He is currently chair of the Greenbelt Council and the Toronto Lands Corporation, and recently chaired the Advisory Panel for the Co-ordinated Land Use Planning Review. He is a Member of the Order of Ontario and an Officer in the Order of Canada. He is a tireless advocate for the City of Toronto.

Emma Tamlin

Emma Tamlin graduated from the University of Waterloo in 2016 with a Bachelor of Environmental Studies. She is currently the Logistics Coordinator at Two Roads Logistics and Co-Chair of the Toronto Youth Food Policy Council.

With a passion for re-naturing cities and an enthusiasm for food because of its connection to human health and environmental sustainability, she hopes to bring more fresh food and nature to cities through urban agriculture and rooftop gardens. In her current position, she hopes to learn how to increase transparency and make more sustainable decisions along the supply chain. Emma loves spreadsheets, cats, and pesto and in her free time, she likes to explore the great outdoors. She is also a podcast addict so please share with her your favourite shows!

Harriet Friedmann

Harriet Friedmann (Honorary member), is a retired University of Toronto sociology professor who has gained an international reputation for her work on the history and dynamics of the global food system. Her policy work is both international (for instance, United Nations expert consensus reports on sustainable farming and food) and did some of the earliest policy development on local and sustainable food. Friedmann was an early member of the TFPC during the 1990s and served as TFPC co-chair for an extended term during amalgamation of Greater Toronto. She helped to find university funding for past TFPC projects, will help the TFPC keep abreast of emerging trends among leading food system thinkers around the world. She now acts as a memory keeper for the Council.

Helene St. Jacques

Helene St. Jacques  

Hélène St. Jacques (Honorary member) is an expert consumer and market researcher with a history that spans many categories within the sustainability and resilience front including the renewal of local and healthy food systems, solid waste diversion and food waste reduction, water conservation, energy conservation and renewable energy.

Janet Horner

Janet Horner

Janet Horner is the Executive Director for the Golden Horseshoe Food and Farming Alliance and the Greater Toronto Area Agricultural Action Committee.  The Alliance oversees the implementation of the Golden Horseshoe Food and Farming Action Plan by working with farmers, rural and urban municipalities, the province and industry to ensure that the Food and Farming Cluster in the Golden Horseshoe is growing and vibrant. Janet’s skills lie in group facilitation and consensus building as she has trained adults and youth in small business start-ups and encourages dialogue between urban and rural residents on land use and food issues. Janet is a partner in the family business, Whitfield Farms Ltd., a cash crop operation in Dufferin County, and for 30 years, operated Whitfield Farms Catering. Janet volunteers her time as a Steering Committee member of Sustain Ontario.  She is also Chair of the board of the Rural Ontario Institute, an organization that develops leaders, initiates dialogue, supports collaboration and promotes action on issues and opportunities facing rural Ontario.

Jenelle Regnier-Davies

Jenelle Regnier-Davies

Jenelle Regnier-Davies has over fifteen years of diverse experience in the food sector. In her search for more meaningful engagement with food, Jenelle moved from a career as a chef, to completing a BA in Environmental Studies and an MA in Geography, studying international household food security. Though she is interested in a wide spectrum of food issues, Jenelle is most passionate about food justice, food education and building a more sustainable, environmentally resilient food system. Today, Jenelle works with Second Harvest to deliver food education and training programs across communities in the GTA.

Councillor Jennifer McKelvie

Jennifer McKelvie (City Councillor) is the City Councillor for Ward 25 Scarborough-Rouge Park. She and her family have lived in Scarborough-Rouge Park since 2005. She is a proud graduate of the University of Toronto Scarborough (B.Sc. Environmental Science) and a Professional Geoscientist. Her graduate (Ph.D. 2006) and postgraduate research was supported by numerous provincial, national and international awards, including the prestigious L’Oréal/United Nations Educational Scientific Organization (UNESCO) Women in Science Fellowship. Prior to becoming Councillor for Scarborough-Rouge Park, Jennifer managed industrial-academic partnerships and environmental research in the non-profit sector. Jennifer has a long-record of community service. She recently served as first President of the Scarborough Community Renewal Organization (2016-2018), and as President of the Centennial Community & Recreation Association (2015 to 2017). In this capacity, she worked collaboratively with stakeholders and residents to advocate for investment in Scarborough. Jennifer has also served as a member of the UTSC Council (2015-2018), as a citizen member of the Toronto Region Conservation Authority (2015-2018) and as a member of the Scarborough Women of Philanthropy (2015-2018), a council in support of the Scarborough & Rouge Hospital Foundation. In 2017, Scarborough Rotary Clubs recognized Jennifer for her dedicated community work with the Paul Harris Fellow award. She is also a recipient of the Leading Women, Building Communities Recognition Award by the Province of Ontario (2015) and was a University of Toronto Scarborough Canada 150 Neighbour (2017).

Councillor Joe Cressy

Joe Cressy (City Councillor, Chair of the Board of Health) is the City Councillor for Ward 10, Spadina-Fort York. A City Councillor since 2014, Joe has been a champion for building a better and more liveable city – for affordable housing, public transit, safe cycling infrastructure, new and improved parkland, expanding community services, childcare, arts and culture, and combatting our growing overdose crisis. Working with local neighbourhoods, Councillor Cressy Joe built new bike lanes across the downtown. He prioritized equity and affordability, securing dozens of new units of affordable housing and standing up for new Torontonians. He fought to improve transit and public space through the King Street Transit Pilot and John Street Cultural Corridor, saved 401 Richmond and created a new arts and cultural tax class, and secured a partnership for a new YMCA on Richmond Street. He championed the creation of the Syrian Refugee Resettlement program. He built new parks and greenspaces in every neighbourhood across the old Ward 20, and fought hard to implement supervised injection services, that are currently saving the lives of Torontonians across the city. In his various appointments, including to the Board of Health and Chair of the Toronto Drug Strategy Implementation Panel, Community Development and Recreation Committee, Toronto Community Housing Corporation Board of Directors, Sub-committee on Climate Change and Adaptation, and previous Toronto Youth Equity Strategy Champion, he is committed to making life fairer, and more liveable for everyone.

Joe Nasr

Joe Nasr

Joe Nasr is a lecturer and associate of the Centre for Studies in Food Security at Ryerson University and co-coordinator of Toronto Urban Growers. His main focus is on urban agriculture, as well as the relation between design and planning and food system issues.  Joe has worked on numerous projects globally that highlight the place of food in cities. He has been involved in urban agriculture issues since the early 1990s.  In Toronto, he has been one of the organizers of the Carrot City initiative, part of creating Toronto Urban Growers, was co-author of a scaling up urban agriculture report, and supported the preparation of the GrowTO Urban Agriculture Action Plan. His primary teaching areas deal with urban food and agriculture systems.

Johl Whiteduck Ringuette

Chef Johl Whiteduck Ringuette is Anishnawbe and Algonquin. He is the sole proprietor of NishDish Marketeria and Catering, a First Nations owned and operated catering business specializing in Anishnawbe cuisine since 2005. As one of Toronto’s leading First Nations food sovereigntists, Chef Johl’s journey has led him to identifying, sourcing, re-learning and reclaiming the traditional Anishnawbe diet. As a public speaker and teacher, he has taught countless traditional food skills, demos and workshops. Chef Johl has written curriculum for his own Ojibiikaan Indigenous Culinary Arts Program, a ceremonial in-depth land and food-based program. Gifts he received of ancestral seeds started an extensive Indigenous seed bank and led to establishing the four urban Indigenous teaching gardens. Johl is also the founding Board President of Ojibiikaan Indigenous Cultural Network, the first and only not-for-profit dedicated to Indigenous Food Sovereignty in the GTA. Chef Johl’s vision is to inspire the return of ancestral lands back to the community for the purposes of growing Indigenous teaching gardens. In December 2017 Chef Johl founded TIBA, the Toronto Indigenous Business Association, renewing the pursuit of an Anishnawbe district for Toronto and building a strong coalition of First Nations social entrepreneurs and business owners. In 2018 he launched the first Indigenous Harvesters and Artisans Market with multiple partnerships at the Bickford Centre, where he curated a series of murals painted by Indigenous artists. Chef Johl received Aboriginal Businessman of the Year award in 2013, and is also an active member of the Toronto Food Policy Council.

Kiera Toffelmire

Kiera Toffelmire is the Senior Manager of Programs and Community Relations at Second Harvest, the largest food rescue organization in Canada. She oversees partnerships with over 260 member agencies across the city to support and help strengthen food programs. Kiera is an active community member co-leading a seniors storytelling project, a board member of Wychwood Open Door, and chairing the TFPC’s food waste sub-committee.

Kimberly Montgomery Rawlings

Kimberly Montgomery Rawlings

Kimberly Montgomery Rawlings is a small business owner, who recently opened a Canadian Food focused restaurant with her husband & Chef, Guy Rawlings. Her background is in Public Relations, Promotions, Sponsorship & Event Logistics. She’s worked for such Toronto institutions as: Citytv & CP24, Pride Toronto, CMWs, to name a few. Kim has cultivated a broad network through her varied experiences hosting cultural, corporate, media, fundraising & private events at venues and festivals throughout the city. Kim aims to bring her enthusiasm for community engagement and sincere respect for food activism to the TFPC.

Koa Thornhill

Koa Thornhill (Community Member) is currently the Program Coordinator for Malvern’s Our Strong Neighbourhood initiative and manages the CEED garden project (Morningside Heights Urban Farm) set to launch in Spring 2019. Koa has worked in communities across Scarborough over the past 12 years addressing socioeconomic barriers and social inequities faced by residents in disadvantaged communities. More recently, she has focused her work around food security issues in Malvern and inner suburban areas. Koa is a University of Toronto graduate with a background in community development, mental health, food justice, program development and teaching.

Leslie Campbell

Leslie Campbell is the Senior Coordinator of Research and Policy Analysis with FoodShare Toronto. Before returning to Toronto to work in food justice, Leslie spent six years working in community development, agriculture, and education in Southeast Asia, East Africa, and Latin America. He is driven by a passion for supporting community food access through the development of sustainable, equitable, and efficient food production and distribution systems.

Leticia Boahen

Leticia Deawuo

Leticia Deawuo is a long-time resident of Jane-Finch Community and mother of two children who has been a leading social activist in Jane-Finch area of Toronto and across the City of Toronto for the past 10 years. As a community resident and organizer, Leticia has been absolutely instrumental in development and formation of a number of prominent community groups and initiatives including Jane Finch On The Move, Jane Finch Action Against Poverty, Jane Finch Political Conversation Café, Black Creek Food Justice Network, Mothers-In-Motion and so on and so forth. Leticia also worked as a Community Development Worker with Jane/Finch Community and Family Centre for many years.

In her capacity as a program worker, then a program manager and now the director of the Black Creek Community Farm, Leticia has shown excellent capabilities to engage residents, allies and other stake holders in struggles for community improvement and social and economic justice including the realization of Food security and food Justice in Jane-Finch. She has helped facilitating the formation of Black Creek Community Farm Resident Council, Black Creek Food Justice Network and has managed to bring together a wide range of allies and supporters together to work for the enhancement of the community farm and the non-profit urban food development in one of Toronto’s most excluded and disadvantaged communities.

Leticia is a member of the Toronto Food Policy Council. She is a new board member to USC Canada and is currently pursuing her Masters in Environmental Studies at York University.

Marina Queirolo

Marina Queirolo Senior Lead of Public Engagement and Food, joined Evergreen in 2010 and has since developed the Food and Public Market Action plan for Evergreen Brick Works. She created a portfolio of programs that promote food literacy, community development, local entrepreneurship and placemaking. Her passion around food and Public Markets motivates her to engage the community & industry to collaborate and work together towards a common goal: A strong local food economy and healthier city for all.

Melana Roberts

Melana Roberts

Melana Roberts is Chair of the Toronto Youth Food Policy Council, an arm of the TFPC recognized as representing the youth voice in food policy in Toronto. She also supports constituency issues and policy development with the office of City Councillor Joe Mihevc. Formerly Coordinator of Malvern’s Action for Neighourhood Change Initiative, she project managed a number of food security initiatives, including Scarborough’s first 2-acre urban farm. With an interest in improving access and equity in Toronto, Melana strives to advance civic engagement through developing tools and resources that empower youth communities and underrepresented groups to drive their own development. In her spare time, Melana supports project coordination for the TFPC’s Food By Ward: Food Assets and Opportunities, a ward by ward mapping tool; and their ongoing Food Champions initiative. She also sits as a Board member for FoodShare, a Community Advisor for Meal Exchange and is part of the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health’s National Youth Advisory Council. Melana holds an MA in International Development Studies from York University, with specializations in rural agriculture, community development and community health systems.

Nathalie Vengal

Nathalie Vengal is a youth, worker and food security advocate. Nathalie has an undergraduate degree in Human Rights and Equity Studies from York University, and now works as a National Representative for the United Food and Commercial Workers Union (UFCW Canada). During her time in university, she was awarded the Equity and Diversity INI award, and founded the “Youth feeding Youth” food bank agency at the Centre for Spanish Speaking Peoples. This agency focuses on serving out-of-status youth and families in the City of Toronto. Nathalie also volunteers as a Board member for the North York Harvest Food Bank and is fluent in both English and Spanish.

Paul Sawtell

Paul Sawtell is the co-founder and co-owner of 100km Foods Inc., an award winning local food distribution company based in Toronto.  Since 2008, Paul has sought to create a strong, viable and fair local food economy that benefits not only consumers, but also the farmers and producers who grow their food. It is Paul’s belief that for-profit organizations, aimed at doing the right thing, can be instruments for real change. 100km Foods Inc. is currently in its 11th year of operation.

Rachel Gray

Rachel Gray

Rachel Gray is Executive Director of The Stop Community Food Centre. Prior to joining The Stop in 2012, Rachel worked nationally and locally with homeless youth, first developing and managing Eva’s Phoenix, and then as Director of Eva’s National Program, facilitating national knowledge sharing initiatives and research projects, and supporting the establishment of a national, partnership based response to youth homelessness. She also worked as a Special Assistant to the Minister of Health for the Government of Ontario. Rachel is the Chair of the Toronto Food Policy Council and a member of the Board of Directors for Dancing with Parkinson’s.

Robert Sleeper

Robert Sleeper is Haudenosaunee from the Mohawks of the Bay of Quinte, Tyendinaga Mohawk Territory. He is the Endaayaang Research Coordinator for the Canadian Observatory on Homelessness at York University. He is a social worker with years of clinical and research experience. He has worked with the Indigenous homeless throughout Ontario, primarily in Toronto and Thunder Bay. He has an undergraduate
Honors Degree in social work from Lakehead University and an MSW in-progress. His current work focuses on Indigenous health and youth homelessness, with expertise in partnership building, ethics, and healing. His research interests and experiences lay in Participatory Action Research, Indigenous education, food security, education and youth identity and wellness.

Ryan Noble

Ryan Noble

Ryan Noble has been Executive Director of North York Harvest Food Bank since February 2015.  Prior to that, Ryan was the Vice-Chair of North York Harvest’s Board of Directors and worked extensively in change management and process improvement in the aerospace sector.  When he’s not at work, Ryan enjoys cooking, travelling and spending time with his long-time partner Jessica.

Sabina Ali

Sabina Ali

Sabina Ali is the Chair and one of the founding members of Thorncliffe Park Women’s Committee – created by residents to advance a transformative vision for Thorncliffe Park and the surrounding community. Under Ali’s leadership, the Women’s Committee revitalized the local park and created a healthy, engaged and inclusive community.
Sabina has worked to build the capacity and economic opportunities of residents and manages a wide variety of food, art, fitness, markets and garden programs. She is currently involved in the community food project called Park Café, a place-based model of local economic development by leveraging neighbourhood assets such as the park, existing bazaar, and local talent to improve livelihoods of low-income residents.
Sabina is the recipient of the Elizabeth Coke award for excellence in leadership in 2011, the 2014 Jane Jacobs Prize for her work in transforming the city through innovative thinking, dedication to community development, and passion for hard work, and the 2014 Phenomenal Woman Award. In the same year she was selected as one of the Top Ten Torontonians to get the things done by Globe and Mail. In 2017 she received an award for excellence in Civic Action and the MP’s Sesquicentennial Citizenship Award. She sits at various committees such as Neighbour’s Night Out Committee, Don Valley Citizenship Ceremony Committee and Jury committee for Ombudsman Awards. She is an active member of Toronto Food Policy Council.

Sarah Elton

Sarah Elton researches and writes about food, food systems and ecological public health. She is the author of four books about sustainability and food, including Consumed: Food for a Finite Planet. Sarah is a doctoral candidate at the University of Toronto’s Dalla Lana School of Public Health where she is investigating urban growing and health. She also teaches food studies at the U of T. Prior to returning to school, Sarah was a well-known CBC journalist and broadcaster.

Sunday Harrison

Sunday Harrison is the founder and Executive Director of Green Thumbs Growing Kids, a community-based non-profit organization based in the downtown east neighbourhoods of Regent Park, Cabbagetown and St. Jamestown, which primarily provides programs for students to raise food on their school grounds and create simple recipes with it. She is an experienced gardener with a Landscape Architecture certificate from Ryerson University, a master’s degree in Environmental Studies, and a graduate Diploma in Environmental and Sustainability Education from York University. She’s passionate about garden-based learning and children’s access to the natural world and healthy fresh food. She is unlearning white supremacy and colonialism, and is learning gratitude and respect.

Susanna Redekop

Susanna Redekop is the Communications Coordinator at Local Food and Farm Co-ops.  Formerly the Communications Coordinator and Floor Coordinator at the West End Food Co-op, Susanna played a key role in opening Toronto’s first multi-stakeholder food co-op and co-managed the store for six years. Susanna holds a B.A. in Anthropology from the University of Toronto.  She has spent a decade working in the food security sector in Toronto, including as a founding member of the Toronto Youth Food Policy Council. She also has a long involvement with a variety of co-operative organizations from housing to childcare to food.  Susanna was awarded the Parkdale-High Park Community Leadership Award in 2018 for her community contribution to the West End Food Co-op and the Parkdale Neighbourhood Land Trust.

Tania Fernandes

Tania Fernandes

Tania Fernandes is the Manager of the Healthy Kids Community Challenge at the Rexdale Community Health Centre.  In  this  role,  she works  with  local  partners  to  design  programs,  policies  and  environmental  supports  to create a healthier Rexdale for children and their families. Tania is also the co-founder of Rexdale’s annual Foodie Festival, which connects community members to local caterers, food programs and advocacy initiatives.  She  has  previously  worked  as  a Health  Promoter  and  is  a  graduate  the  Master  of  Public  Health  program  at  the University of Waterloo.

Tinashe Kanengoni

Tinashe Kanengoni

Tinashe Kanengoni manages the development of food buying clubs in social housing. An organic urban farmer at the Black Creek Community Farm with the Afri-Can FoodBasket. He is an organic master gardener and has a Masters in Environmental Studies from York University.

 OUR STAFF at Toronto Public Health

Lori Stahlbrand

Lori Stahlbrand

Lori Stahlbrand As a Health Policy Specialist with the Toronto Food Strategy team in the City of Toronto’s Department of Public Health, Lori is responsible for the Toronto Food Policy Council. Prior to joining the City, Lori was Food Equity Coordinator and lecturer in food studies at New College, University of Toronto. She has a PhD in Geography from Wilfrid Laurier University, with a research focus on the role of creative public procurement in promoting just and sustainable local food systems in Canada and the UK. As the founder and former president of the non-profit Local Food Plus, Lori promoted local and sustainable food procurement as a tool for social and economic development. Prior to engaging with food issues, Lori spent 15 years as a nationally-recognized journalist and broadcaster with the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation.